Discussion on: ‘One year after Galwan: The road ahead for Sino India Relations’

Discussion on: ‘One year after Galwan: The road ahead for Sino India Relations’
Taylor Fravel, Suhasini Haidar, Shyam Saran, Sushant Singh
Thursday, 17 June 2021 Add to Calendar 2021-06-17 17:30:00 2021-06-17 19:00:00 Asia/Kolkata Discussion on: ‘One year after Galwan: The road ahead for Sino India Relations’ The Centre for Policy Research (CPR) invites you to a virtual panel discussion on: ‘One year after Galwan: The road ahead for Sino India Relations’ Panelists: Taylor Fravel, Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Suhasini Haidar, National Editor and Diplomatic Affairs Editor, The Hindu Shyam Saran, Former Indian Foreign Secretary and Senior Fellow, CPR  Moderator:  Sushant Singh, Senior Fellow, CPR The session will be online via Zoom, Please Register Here. The session will also be live-streamed on the CPR Facebook Page. In case of any issues and for any queries, please email at communication@cprindia.org. About the Discussion On 15 June 2020, 20 Indian soldiers and at least 4 Chinese PLA soldiers lost their lives in a clash in Galwan Valley, in what were the first deaths in military clashes in Ladakh after the 1962 War. The incident came six weeks after the border crisis began in Ladakh which has since seen thousands of soldiers from both armies confront each other at high altitude in inhospitable weather. The process of disengagement which started in February has been stalled, with no de-escalation or de-induction, and no disengagement at other 'friction points'. In an attempt to tackle the Chinese threat, India has attempted internal and external rebalancing but its stated goal of restoring the status quo ante as of April 2020 remains elusive. New Delhi has reoriented some of its forces from the Pakistan front towards the China front, even as it has sought peace on the Line of Control with Pakistan. India has also attended the Quad summit and made other moves to work closely with its strategic partners in the Indo-Pacific. Meanwhile, Beijing has moved more aggressively into the neighbourhood as India's mishandling of the second wave of the pandemic has placed it in a precarious situation. The trade imbalance remains weighed in Beijing's favour even as India attempts to keep Chinese high-technology companies out. With India's economic growth subsiding and additional military deployments on the China border continuing, India finds itself at a crossroad. What are the diplomatic, military, political and economic choices before India? Where does the road from Galwan lead to for Sino-Indian relations? Online via Zoom
5:30 pm to 7:00 pm
Online via Zoom

The Centre for Policy Research (CPR) invites you to a virtual panel discussion on: ‘One year after Galwan: The road ahead for Sino India Relations’

Panelists:

  • Taylor Fravel, Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
  • Suhasini Haidar, National Editor and Diplomatic Affairs Editor, The Hindu
  • Shyam Saran, Former Indian Foreign Secretary and Senior Fellow, CPR 

Moderator: 

  • Sushant Singh, Senior Fellow, CPR

The session will be online via Zoom, Please Register Here. The session will also be live-streamed on the CPR Facebook Page.

In case of any issues and for any queries, please email at communication@cprindia.org.

About the Discussion

On 15 June 2020, 20 Indian soldiers and at least 4 Chinese PLA soldiers lost their lives in a clash in Galwan Valley, in what were the first deaths in military clashes in Ladakh after the 1962 War. The incident came six weeks after the border crisis began in Ladakh which has since seen thousands of soldiers from both armies confront each other at high altitude in inhospitable weather. The process of disengagement which started in February has been stalled, with no de-escalation or de-induction, and no disengagement at other 'friction points'.

In an attempt to tackle the Chinese threat, India has attempted internal and external rebalancing but its stated goal of restoring the status quo ante as of April 2020 remains elusive. New Delhi has reoriented some of its forces from the Pakistan front towards the China front, even as it has sought peace on the Line of Control with Pakistan. India has also attended the Quad summit and made other moves to work closely with its strategic partners in the Indo-Pacific. Meanwhile, Beijing has moved more aggressively into the neighbourhood as India's mishandling of the second wave of the pandemic has placed it in a precarious situation. The trade imbalance remains weighed in Beijing's favour even as India attempts to keep Chinese high-technology companies out.

With India's economic growth subsiding and additional military deployments on the China border continuing, India finds itself at a crossroad. What are the diplomatic, military, political and economic choices before India? Where does the road from Galwan lead to for Sino-Indian relations?