ENVIRONMENTALITY, A BLOG BY THE CENTRE FOR POLICY RESEARCH

17 February 2021
CPR LAUNCHES PLATFORM DEDICATED TO TOPICAL COMMENTARY AND NEW IDEAS AT THE INTERSECTION OF ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

Centre for Policy Research is pleased to announce the launch of Environmentality, a new blog created and edited by researchers at the CPR Initiative on Climate, Energy and Environment.

Environmentality aims to spark and inform debate on topical issues at the intersection of environment and development. With a nod to Arun Agarwal’s thought-provoking book of the same name, we see Environmentality as less a blog about the environment, and more one that takes the environment seriously in understanding the economy, society, and processes of development.

Befitting a public policy organisation, we examine questions of policy, law, institutions and governance, particularly around climate change, energy and air pollution. But equally, we explore how the work of building a sustainable and more just future benefits from serious engagement with politics and discourse. We particularly focus on India, but in a globalised world we certainly pay attention to how India is shaped by and shapes global currents.

The blog is organised into four sections: commentary on current developments, ideas that highlight important new perspectives and frameworks, new at ICEE that provides quick takes on our own research and events, and stories to watch which curates our pick of recent climate, energy and environmental news.

We invite you to visit our blog at www.environmentality.cprindia.org, to sign up to receive our fortnightly updates, and to share your thoughts through regular comments.

ABOUT US

The Initiative on Climate, Energy and Environment at the Centre for Policy Research (CPR-ICEE) aims to stimulate an informed debate on the laws, policies and institutions shaping climate, energy and environmental governance in India. Our research focuses on an improved understanding of climate, development and environmental challenges – and pathways to improved outcomes – in four key areas: climate policy and institutions, the political economy of electricity in India, low-carbon energy demand patterns in urban areas, and air quality governance.

The views shared belong to individual faculty and researchers and do not represent an institutional stance on the issue.