Symposium Report–Constitutionalism, Religious Freedom and Human Rights: Constitutional Migration and Transjudicialism beyond the North Atlantic

By Mirjam Künkler, Shylashri Shankar, and Tine Stein
I-Connect
6 June 2015

Creating a framework of religion-state relations that would mollify tensions between religions, within religions, and between believers and non-believers, has been the bane of many a constitution-framer’s existence. And when issues pertaining to the ambit of religious freedom show up in the docket of the court, judges have struggled with interpreting these rights in a way that would create a fair trade-off between religious freedom and other human rights.  Given these challenges, constitutional framers and judges increasingly look abroad for orientation, both to be inspired as well as to learn from negative lessons. As not much attention has been paid so far to the frameworks of religion-state relations that have migrated between constitutions and between courts, this conference set out to do so.

Suggested Citation: Mirjam Künkler, Shylashri Shankar and Tine Stein, Symposium Report–Constitutionalism, Religious Freedom and Human Rights: Constitutional Migration and Transjudicialism beyond the North Atlantic, Int’l. J. Const. L. Blog, Feb. 23, 2016,